23rd - 24th May 2017
Frankfurt, Germany

Organised by info@tdnuk.com +44 (0) 1245 407 916

To download full agenda, click here.

DAY ONE – 23rd MAY 2017

“Diversifying the role of a scout helicopter”

08:00 -
Registration and Welcome Coffee
08:55 -
Chairman's opening remarks

Paul Kennard, Former Air Domain /Weapons Future Technology Requirements Manager, UK MoD DE&S

DEVELOPING A MULTI-ROLE CAPABILITY

As the military helicopter market becomes more competitive it has become crucial to maximise return on investment through diversifying the number of roles a helicopter can conduct on the battlefield. Adding capabilities to legacy platforms is a crucial element in any military modernisation plan and this section will explore ways in which the scout helicopter fleet could provide additional uses to the modern military.

09:00 -

Improving technological cooperation between the military and civilian communities

  • An overview of EASA and the advantage of cooperation with the military sector
  • Findings of EASA research and achieving higher standards of airworthiness
  • Bringing together industry, military and civilian research to ensure helicopter safety

Major General (ret) Denis Koehl, Senior Adviser, European Aviation Safety Agency

09:30 -

H145M, the new battlefield support helicopter designed for demanding operations

  • The H145M Programme: Status and development
  • HForce: The accurate and incremental weapon system by Airbus
  • H145M: The turn-key solution covering missions from light utility to light attack

Christian Fanchini, Senior Operational Marketing Manager / Military Missions Specialist, Airbus

10:00 -

The adaptation of maritime platforms to fulfil numerous mission-sets

  • Blending capabilities: Wildcat helicopters in the littoral
  • Update on the transition from Lynx to Wildcat in the Royal Navy
  • ISTAR systems and additions to the Wildcat design

Commander Gus Carnie, Lynx Wildcat Maritime Force Commander, Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm

10:30 -
Morning Coffee and Networking

Hosted By

SENSOR UPGRADES AND IMPROVEMENTS

A key concept of scout helicopters is the ability to observe and collect information before land, sea or air forces arrive. Reconnaissance and sensor technology is a crucial element of any scout helicopters armoury and this section will analyse how this is best achieved.

11:15 -

Gaining a combat advantage through sensor utilisation

  • The role of sensor technology for operating in difficult terrain
  • Training crew to operate modern, integrated sensors
  • Current industry technology for effective reconnaissance

Major Cedric Bowes-Lyon, Directorate of Air Requirements 9-4 (Tactical Helicopter Requirements, Royal Canadian Air Force

11:45 -

The Wescam Matrix ISR and weapons system

  • MX Sensors and their use in target acquisition
  • Integration of ISR and weapons systems
  • Case study: The OH-58D and armed UH-60

John Vandenberg, Director – Army and special programs – Wescam MX Systems, L-3 Wescam

12:15 -

Moving on from the Middle-East: Scout platforms for future warfare

  • The Kiowa Programme: Updates and developments
  • Exchange of sensor technology to future platforms
  • Improving relations with developing militaries by boosting aerial capabilities

Major Frederick Keller, G3 AVN Planner, US Army Europe

12:45 -

Lunch and Networking

Hosted By

ON BOARD SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

Scout helicopters operate a unique role in the modern battlefield, while their role is primarily non-attack focused they operate in a variety of challenging environments. Protection of the helicopter and the protection of its crew is instrumental in attaining mission success. Avoiding obstructions and operating in degraded visibility are just a few issues a scout helicopter could be faced with during an operation.

14:15 -

Adapting the newly acquired Kiowa Warriors to meet Croatian demands

  • Introduction to operational service
  • Initial operational capability
  • Full operational capability

Lieutenant Colonel Davor Gren, XO, OH-58D Squadron,Croatian Air Force

14:45 -

The advantages of a multirole capability cockpit

  • Situational awareness
  • Mission integration
  • The role played by the system in surveillance operations

Michael J Rogerson, CEO, Rogerson Kratos

15:15 -

Scout helicopter operations in a degraded visual environment

  • Battling the effects of a degraded visual environment through high resolution sensors
  • High resolution display and pilot interface for DVE operations
  • Managing the helicopters ability to maintain operability during low visibility landing and take off

Paul Kennard, Former Air Domain /Weapons Future Technology Requirements Manager, UK MoD DE&S

15:45 -

Afternoon Tea and Networking

Hosted By

DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION

Developing a comprehensive understanding of the environment you are operating in is crucial to mission success. Whether through sensors, cameras or radar there is a push from the rotary wing military to further develop external situational awareness. Knowing your surroundings is the first step to planning for and achieving success for the scout helicopter.

16:30 –

On board communications that enhance information sharing with other platforms

  • Installation of cameras and combining search with other connected assets
  • Reducing radar signature as to avoid enemy detection
  • On board communications that enhance information sharing with other platforms

Major Gabriel Goaga, SOF Branch Head, Romanian Air Force

17:00 –

Panel Discussion: Incorporating future military technology with scout helicopters

  • Secure data exchange – data links and cloud based systems
  • Automation of information exchanges
  • Unmanned technology and its role in future warfare with scout helicopters

Major Tapio Saarelainen, Research Staff Officer Research and Development Department / Army Research Center / Army Academy, Finnish Defence Forces

Lieutenant Colonel Tomas Navratil, 223 Maintenance Squadron Commander - 22 Helicopter Base, Czech Air Force

Lieutenant Colonel Charlie Howard-Higgins, Deputy Command and Chief of Staff, Aviation Reconnaissance Force – British Army

18:00 –

Chairman’s Summary

Paul Kennard, Former Air Domain /Weapons Future Technology Requirements Manager, UK MoD DE&S

18:15 –
Networking Drinks Reception in Exhibition Room

DAY TWO – 24th MAY 2017

”Maintaining and amending existing platforms”

08:00 -
Registration and Welcome Coffee
08:55 -

Chairman’s Introduction

Paul Kennard, Former Air Domain /Weapons Future Technology Requirements Manager, UK MoD DE&S

MAINTENANCE, REPAIR AND OVERHAUL: UPGRADING THE FLEET

A major challenge for industry and military collaboration is to provide cost-effective solutions to gaining maximum operational life from a helicopter type. This creates an opportunity for a greater variety of industry companies to provide platform-specific or off the shelf solutions to extend or renew scout capabilities.

09:00 -

The unique challenges of maintaining and upgrading Mi helicopters for the Czech fleet

  • The role of secondary suppliers in developing niche technology
  • Review of the current utility helicopter component of the Air Force
  • Military input into the design and manufacturing stages

Lieutenant Colonel Tomas Navratil, 223 Maintenance Squadron Commander - 22 Helicopter Base, Czech Air Force

09:30 -

Maintenance, repair and overhauls in austere environments

  • The effects of different climates on a helicopters functionality
  • The extent of the UK Whole Force Approach and implications for austere environments
  • The role of the contractor in austere situations
10:00 -

The approach of the Hungarian Air Force to diversify platform capabilities

  • The Eastern Europe approach to multi-role platforms and efforts to modernise
  • The difficulty in operating Soviet era helicopters and maintenance issues
  • Future procurement plans for the Hungarian fleet

Colonel Tamás Bali, Deputy Base Commander - 86 Szolnok Helicopter Base, Hungarian Air Force

10:30 -
Morning Coffee and Networking

UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES

The role of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) is growing and the impact to the safety of personnel could be huge. As investment in these systems grows there is a recognition within the military that UAV’s could augment scout fleets in hostile environments. This section will look to cover how UAV’s can provide support and integrate effectively with existing platforms.

11:15 -

Overcoming the challenges of integrating helicopter assets and UAV’s

  • Information sharing between unmanned and manned platforms
  • Operating unmanned assets for scout and utility missions
  • The tactical effects of using both unmanned and manned systems

Major Tapio Saarelainen, Research Staff Officer Research and Development Department / Army Research Center / Army Academy,Finnish Defence Forces

11:45 -

Increasing the range and payload of UAV’s

  • Current trialling of unmanned helicopter technology
  • Enhancing the resistance and durability of a UAV
  • Pursuing a more self-reliant drone with automated decision making
12:15 -

Manned-unmanned and pairs teaming

  • The British Army FF25 construct and plans for manned-unmanned teaming
  • Coordinating and utilising unmanned assets during operations
  • Capability development for unmanned assets in the British Army

Lieutenant Colonel Charlie Howard-Higgins, Deputy Commander and Chief of Staff, Aviation Reconnaissance Force, British Army

12:45 -
Lunch and Networking

AVIONICS

A helicopter’s computer system is the central component from which all other assets are managed. Advanced avionics allow the scout helicopter to fulfil a variety of roles while supplying pilots and operational commanders with the clearest picture of the situation possible. This segment will explore how a helicopters avionics can be developed whilst being fully integrated in legacy and next-generation platforms.

13:45 -

Comparison between military and civil technological requirements

  • Law enforcement autopilot features lack of practicality in military tactical low level environments
  • Different communication systems used across military, law and civil platforms
  • Addressing vulnerabilities in digital assets for critical flight infrastructure

Captain Till Vromans, SME Rotary Wing (SOF Air), German Air Operations Command

14:15 -

Panel Discussion: The role of the scout helicopter in future warfare

  • Utilising scout helicopters in collaboration with future technology
  • Managing requirement needs with budgetary restrictions
  • Plans for future procurement and industry requirements

Commander Gus Carnie, Lynx Wildcat Maritime Force Commander, Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm

Major Frederick Keller, G3 AVN Planner, US Army Europe

Lieutenant Colonel Davor Gren, XO, OH-58D Squadron, Croatian Air Force

15:15 -

Chairman’s summary and close of conference

Paul Kennard, Former Air Domain /Weapons Future Technology Requirements Manager, UK MoD DE&S